Eloquent – Etymology

Eloquent

Eloquent is an adjective meaning persuasive speech or writing. It has Latin roots which meant ‘speaking out’ and from the verb eloqui. It’s borrowed from the French word éloquent. When describing someone is eloquent, you’re saying that their way of speaking or writing is impactful.

Someone who is eloquent is powerful in expressing strong emotions or to state factual arguments with fluency. But, eloquent has evolved to mean more than its initial definition.

“Action is eloquence.”  – William Shakespeare

Therefore, you could say that eloquence is someone who invokes a positive emotion in another; someone who is classy; someone who understands a situation and reacts to it appropriately.

Still confused at what eloquent means? Fortunately, the U-Dictionary APP available on both Google Play and the APP Store provides translations instantly.

Tip: U-Dictionary’s instant translation provides bilingual sentences, sample sentences, and cognate words in addition to the simple translation so you can better understand the use of a word.

Eloquent also has a noun form, eloquence, which has the same meaning as its adjective counterpart. Eloquence is developed from the Latin eloquentia.

The peak use of this word was in the 1850s. Since then, it has significantly declined. While not commonly used in casual conversations, it more often appears in writing prose.

Sample Sentences

Here are some samples sentences using eloquent.

  1. Her speech was very eloquent for her age.
  2. He looks like a very eloquent person.
  3. Her silence showed her eloquent nature.

Synonyms

Synonyms for the word involve poise, fluency, fervour, and expressiveness.

Antonyms

Some commonly used antonyms for the word are impotence, inability, and incompetence.