Learn English Phrases Everyday [audio]

1. Add insult to injury 
The phrase “add insult to injury” is a common English idiom. It means to make a bad situation worse. This phrase is usually used as part of a sentence.
Here are three example sentences for your reference.
“They told me I didn’t have enough experience, and to add insult to injury, they hired my friend who had similar qualifications as me. “
“First, he missed his bus, and to add insult to injury, it started pouring. “
“Only five people came to his party, and to add insult to injury, some left before it was over.”

2. Once in a blue moon
Another English phrase is “once in a blue moon.” It is often used as part of a sentence. This phrase is used as another way to say rarely.
Here are three example sentences for your reference.
“She gets drunk once in a blue moon.”
“A chance like this comes once in a blue moon!”
“You find a rare item like this once in a blue moon.”

Learn English Phrases Everyday [audio]

1. A blessing in disguise
The phrase “a blessing in disguise” is a common English idiom. It means a good thing that appeared bad at first. In other words, it is used to describe something good that you initially thought was bad.
Here are three example sentences for your reference.
“Losing that job was a blessing in disguise. It made me pursue my dream of being an entrepreneur.”
“Dropping that class was a blessing in disguise. He ended up taking another class which helped in boosting his overall GPA.”
“Her injury was a blessing in disguise, for she got some much-needed rest.”

2. It’s not rocket science
Another English phrase is “it’s not rocket science.” It is often used as a standalone. In other words, you do not necessarily use it as part of a sentence. This phrase is used to say that the task at hand is not complicated.
Here are three example sentences for your reference.
“You simply file the paperwork. It’s not rocket science.”
“Changing the oil in your car is easy. Don’t worry, it’s not rocket science.”
“While fixing my broken garage door is not rocket science, I’m still having trouble with it.”

Talk: Dealing With Stress

adult, alone, black and white

男底色.png You don’t look so well. Is something wrong?

女底色.png I’ve been feeling quite stressed lately.

男底色.png I see. Is there anything I can help with?

女底色.pngActually, I wanted to ask you how you normally deal with stress. You always seem so calm in nerve-racking situations.

男底色.pngThere are many ways I deal with stress. I usually try to keep a clear mind so I can properly prioritize. Then I get started with what needs to get done. 

女底色.png So you try to keep your emotions at bay first?

男底色.png Yes, getting too emotional will only cause more problems, and it will also stress you out more.

女底色.png Yes, I agree. I have a bad habit of getting too emotional during stressful situations. 

男底色.pngIt does take time.  I hope everything goes well with whatever you’re dealing with.

女底色.png Thank you.

 

Learn English Phrases Everyday [audio]

1. Foot in the door
The phrase “foot in the door” is used in a figurative sense. It is used to describe a way in where progress will be made later. Here are three example sentences for your reference.
“You could take on an easier job to get your foot in the door.”
“I didn’t have the qualifications for the job I wanted, so I took this one to get my foot in the door.”
“New graduates are always looking to get their foot in the door with large companies.”

2. A wolf in sheep’s clothing
Another English phrase is “a wolf in sheep’s clothing.” It is used to describe someone with immoral or malicious intentions disguised by kindness. In other words, it is used as cautionary advice to describe someone who necessarily cannot be trusted. Here are three example sentences for your reference.
“He’s a wolf in sheep’s clothing.”
“In the end, she was a wolf in sheep’s clothing.”
“He was trusted until they realized that he was a wolf in sheep’s clothing.”