[Quotes] A Tale Of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a historical novel by Charles Dickens, set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel tells the story of the French Doctor Manette, his 18-year-long imprisonment in the Bastille in Paris and his release to live in London with his daughter Lucie, whom he had never met. The story is set against the conditions that led up to the French Revolution and the Reign of Terror.

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Let’s look at the following quotes from the masterpiece

“O Miss Manette, when the little picture of a happy father’s face looks up in yours, when you see your own bright beauty springing up anew at your feet, think now and then that there is a man who would give his life, to keep a life you love beside you!” 

“A day wasted on others is not wasted on one’s self.” 

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of light, it was the season of darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair.” 

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“Death may beget life, but oppression can beget nothing other than itself.”

“Crush humanity out of shape once more, under similar hammers, and it will twist itself into the same tortured forms. Sow the same seeds of rapacious licence and oppression over again, and it will surely yield the same fruit according to its kind.” 

“Nothing that we do, is done in vain. I believe, with all my soul, that we shall see triumph.”

“That glorious vision of doing good is so often the sanguine mirage of so many good minds.”

“Vengeance and retribution require a long time; it is the rule.” 

Time to learn some useful collocations and phrases

“when you see your own bright beauty springing up anew at your feet, think now and then that there is a man who would give his life, to keep a life you love beside you!” 

1. spring upto start to exist suddenly

  • Bourgeois houses only began to spring up there twenty-five years later.
  • New factories were spring up all over the country.

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Sow the same seeds of rapacious licence and oppression over again, and it will surely yield the same fruit according to its kind.”

2. yield

[v] to supply or produce something positive such as a profit, an amount of good or information

  • Favourable weather yielded a good crop.

[v] to give up the control of or responsibility for something, often because you have been forced to

  • They were forced to yield (up) their land to the occupying forces.

[v]  to bend or break under pressure

  • His legs began to yield under the sheer weight of his body.

[v]  to stop in order to allow other vehicles to go past, especially before you drive onto a bigger road

  • If you’re going downhill, you need to yield to bikers going uphill.

[n] an amount of something positive, such as food or profit

  • Yields on gas and electricity shares are consistently high.

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“Nothing that we do, is done in vain. I believe, with all my soul, that we shall see triumph.”

3. in vain-without success or a result

  • All his efforts were in vain.
  • He still reasoned with her, but in vain.

Well, that’s all for [Quotes] today!

Hope you can learn more useful collocations here.

As usual, please make sentences with at least one of the phrases above.

Look forward to your comments!

Have a nice day!

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