Run-on sentences are two complete sentences fused into one without using coordination conjunctions or proper punctuation. They can be short or long; a long sentence doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a run-on sentence.

Here are three examples of a run-on sentence:

  1. She decided to have dinner with Min however it was cancelled last minute.
  2. She prefers roses to tulips John didn’t know that.
  3. He loved playing games she did too.

Run-on sentences are tedious to read; the reader doesn’t know when or where to stop to absorb what they read. Additionally, your ideas can easily get lost in the flow of information.

Here are the corrected examples of the run-on sentences above:

  1. She decided to have dinner with Min; however, it was cancelled last minute.
  2. She prefers roses to tulips, but John didn’t know that.
  3. He loved playing games. She did too.

Based on the corrections, did you already catch how they can be corrected?

How To Correct Run-On Sentences

The best way to avoid run-on sentences is to see if there are multiple ideas communicated by two or more complete sentences.

Referring to the first example above, “Dinner with Min” and “cancelled last minute” are two ideas. Therefore, you can separate them using a period or with the proper conjunction and punctuation.

However, be careful of punctuation. By placing a comma between two complete sentences doesn’t eliminate the run-on sentence problem. Refer to the example below:

The concert has started, we should hurry inside.

The above example is still a run-on sentence. This kind of run-on sentence is a comma splice. Comma splices can be fixed with the same solutions as normal run-on sentences.

Test Your Knowledge

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