English Grammar mistakes

Hello busy people, welcome back to Part -3.

10. Me/myself/I:

The rules:

  • When referring to yourself and someone else, put their name first in the sentence.
  • Choose “me” or “I” by removing their name and seeing which sounds right.

How not to do it:

  • Me and John are off to the circus.
  • Myself and John are going into town.

How to do it properly:

  • John and I are off to the circus.
  • John and I are going into town.

11. Invite/invitation:

The rules:

  • “Invite” is a verb – “to invite”. It refers to asking someone if they’d like to do something or go somewhere.
  • “Invitation” is a noun – “an invitation”. It refers to the actual message asking someone if they’d like to do something or go somewhere.

How not to do it:

  • I haven’t responded to her invite yet.
  • She sent me an invite.

How to do it properly:

  • I haven’t responded to her invitation yet.
  • She sent me an invitation.

12. Who/whom:

The rules:

  • “Who” refers to the subject of a sentence; “whom” refers to the object.
  • “Who” and “whom” work in the same way as “he” or “him”. You can work out which you should use by asking yourself the following:

How not to do it:

  • Who shall I invite?
  • Whom is responsible?

How to do it properly:

  • Whom shall I invite?
  • Who is responsible?

13. Affect/effect:

The rules:

  • Affect is a verb – “to affect” – meaning to influence or have an impact on something.
  • Effect is the noun – “a positive effect” – referring to the result of being affected by something.

How not to do it:

  • He waited for the medicine to have an affect.
  • They were directly effected by the flooding.

How to do it properly:

  • He waited for the medicine to have an effect.
  • They were directly affected by the flooding.

14. I.e. and e.g.:

The rules:

  • I.e. means “that is” or “in other words”. It comes from the Latin words “id est”.
  • E.g. means “for example”. It comes from the Latin words “exempli gratia”.

How not to do it:

  • He liked many different cheeses, i.e. cheddar, camembert and brie.
  • He objects to the changes – e.g. he won’t be accepting them.

How to do it properly:

  • He liked many different cheeses, e.g. cheddar, camembert and brie.
  • He objects to the changes – i.e. he won’t be accepting them.

We hope you’ve found this a useful reference guide as you continue your journey to become fluent in English.

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Note: This article has been adapted from the following source:

https://www.oxford-royale.co.uk/articles/15-common-grammar-gripes-avoid.html

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