Common Grammatical Mistakes in English – And How to Avoid Them.

English Grammar mistakes

If you’re currently in the process of learning English, and you’re struggling to get to grips with our grammar, don’t take it to heart.

Part 1:

1. Misplaced apostrophes: Apostrophes aren’t difficult to use once you know how, but putting them in the wrong place is one of the most common grammar mistakes in the English language.

The rules:

  • Apostrophes indicate possession – something belonging to something or someone else.
  • To indicate something belonging to one person, the apostrophe goes before the ‘s’. For instance, “The girl’s horse.”

How not to do it: Ex:

  •   The horse’s are in the field.
  •   Pen’s for sale.
  •   In the 1980’s.

How to do it properly: Ex:

  •   The horses are in the field
  •   Pens for sale.
  •   In the 1980s.

2.Your/you’re:

The rules:

  •    “Your” indicates possession – something belonging to you.
  •    “You’re” is short for “you are”.

How not to do it: Ex:

  •    Your beautiful
  •    Do you know when your coming over?

How to do it properly: Ex:

  • You’re beautiful.
  • Do you know when you’re coming over?

3.Its/it’s:

The rules:

  •    “It’s” is only ever used when short for “it is”.
  •    “Its” indicates something belonging to something that isn’t masculine or feminine (like “his” and “hers”, but used when you’re not talking about a person).

How not to do it: Ex:

  •    Its snowing outside.
  •    The sofa looks great with it’s new cover.

How to do it properly: Ex:

  • It’s snowing outside.
  • The sofa looks great with its new cover.

4.“Could/would/should of”:

The rules:

  • When people write “should of”, what they really mean is “should have”.
  • Written down, the shortened version of “should have” is “should’ve”.

How not to do it: Ex:

  •    We could of gone there today.
  •    I would of done it sooner.

How to do it properly: Ex:

  • We could’ve gone there today.
  • I would have done it sooner.

5.There/their/they’re:

The rules:

  • Use “there” to refer to a place that isn’t here – “over there”.
  • We also use “there” to state something – “There are no cakes left.”

How not to do it: Ex:

  •    Their going to be here soon.
  •    We should contact they’re agent.

How to do it properly: Ex:

  • They’re going to be here soon.
  • We should contact their agent.

So, stay tuned and share U-Dictionary app with your friends & family so that you can get more useful English Learning articles.

Note: This article has been adapted from the following source:

https://www.oxford-royale.co.uk/articles/15-common-grammar-gripes-avoid.html

 

 

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